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State of Alaska > Department of Education & Early Development > Content Standards


HISTORY

A A student should understand that history is a record of human experiences that links the past to the present and the future.

A student who meets the content standard should:

  1. understand chronological frameworks for organizing historical thought and place significant ideas, institutions, people, and events within time sequences;
  2. know that the interpretation of history may change as new evidence is discovered;
  3. recognize different theories of history, detect the weakness of broad generalization, and evaluate the debates of historians;
  4. understand that history relies on the interpretation of evidence;
  5. understand that history is a narrative told in many voices and expresses various perspectives of historical experience;
  6. know that cultural elements, including language, literature, the arts, customs, and belief systems, reflect the ideas and attitudes of a specific time and know how the cultural elements influence human interaction;
  7. understand that history is dynamic and composed of key turning points;
  8. know that history is a bridge to understanding groups of people and an individual's relationship to society; and
  9. understand that history is a fundamental connection that unifies all fields of human understanding and endeavor.
B A student should understand historical themes through factual knowledge of time, places, ideas, institutions, cultures, people, and events.

A student who meets the content standard should:

  1. comprehend the forces of change and continuity that shape human history through the following persistent organizing themes:
    1. the development of culture, the emergence of civilizations, and the accomplishments and mistakes of social organizations;
    2. human communities and their relationships with climate, subsistence base, resources, geography, and technology;
    3. the origin and impact of ideologies, religions, and institutions upon human societies;
    4. the consequences of peace and violent conflict to societies and their cultures;
    5. major developments in societies as well as changing patterns related to class, ethnicity, race, and gender;
  2. understand the people and the political, geographic, economic, cultural, social, and environmental events that have shaped the history of the state, the United States, and the world;
  3. recognize that historical understanding is relevant and valuable in the student's life and for participating in local, state, national, and global communities;
  4. recognize the importance of time, ideas, institutions, people, places, cultures, and events in understanding large historical patterns; and
  5. evaluate the influence of context upon historical understanding.
C A student should develop the skills and processes of historical inquiry.

A student who meets the content standard should:

  1. use appropriate technology to access, retrieve, organize, and present historical information;
  2. use historical data from a variety of primary resources, including letters, diaries, oral accounts, archeological sites and artifacts, art, maps, photos, historical sites, documents, and secondary research materials, including almanacs, books, indices, and newspapers;
  3. apply thinking skills, including classifying, interpreting, analyzing, summarizing, synthesizing, and evaluating, to understand the historical record; and
  4. use historical perspective to solve problems, make decisions, and understand other traditions.
D A student should be able to integrate historical knowledge with historical skill to effectively participate as a citizen and as a lifelong learner.

A student who meets the content standard should:

  1. understand that the student is important in history;
  2. solve problems by using history to identify issues and problems, generate potential solutions, assess the merits of options, act, and evaluate the effectiveness of actions;
  3. define a personal position on issues while understanding the historical aspects of the positions and roles assumed by others;
  4. recognize and demonstrate that various issues may require an understanding of different positions, jobs, and personal roles depending on place, time, and context;
  5. base personal citizenship action on reasoned historical judgment with recognition of responsibility for self and others; and
  6. create new approaches to issues by incorporating history with other disciplines, including economics, geography, literature, the arts, science, and technology.

 

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