Alaska State Literacy Blueprint

School/Community Professional Development

Delivery

  • The state, districts, and community agencies pool resources and expertise to increase training opportunities.
  • Early childhood providers and educators, including paraprofessionals, participate in staff development that is ongoing, collaborative, job-embedded, and includes mentoring/coaching.
  • Frequency, intensity, and duration of staff development varies with the needs of students as shown in data and with staff expertise as determined by needs assessment.
  • The state and districts work with local community organizations to use a range of technologies and media to provide information about early literacy to parents and caregivers including the following:
    • Web sites.
    • Video conferencing.
    • Social networking.
    • Parent institutes.
    • Print Media.
    • Television and radio.
  • University literacy instructors collaborate with school or program sites to help prepare effective literacy teachers.

Resources

  • Schools and early care and learning programs develop and implement a statewide quality rating system for early care and learning programs to assess their early literacy practices.
  • Professional developers reference the SEED Early Childhood Professional Development Plan.
  • Schools and early care and learning programs utilize the SEED Registry data to identify literacy professional development needs and align resources.
  • The state and districts will work with local community organizations to provide parents and caregivers information about the following:
    • Milestones of early literacy.
    • Where to seek resources.
    • How they can foster their child’s developing literacy.

Content

  • State and districts provide early care and learning providers with professional development about effective practices to promote the following:
    • Oral language and vocabulary.
    • Phonological awareness.
    • Letter knowledge and phonics.
    • Print awareness.
    • Comprehension.
    • Print motivation and writing.
    • Understanding content and ability to relate to own experiences.
  • Schools and programs ensure that educators receive professional development in the use of appropriate assessment tools and the analysis of assessment results.

Delivery

  • The state, districts, and community agencies pool resources and expertise to increase training opportunities.
  • Teachers, including paraprofessionals, participate in staff development that is ongoing, collaborative, job-embedded, and includes mentoring/coaching
  • Frequency, intensity and duration of staff development varies with the needs of students as shown in data and with staff expertise as determined by needs assessment.
  • The state and districts work with local community organizations to use a range of technologies and media to provide information about literacy to parents including the following:
    • Web sites.
    • Video conferencing.
    • Social networking.
    • Parent institutes.
    • Print Media.
    • Television and radio.
  • University literacy instructors collaborate with school sites to prepare effective literacy teachers.

Resources

  • Schools provide written guides that break down essential elements and expectations of literacy to parents and community members. These guides are written in accessible language and available in families’ primary languages.
  • Schools engage community leaders including Elders and other cultural experts as key resources to support guidance, dissemination and implementation of the essential elements of the literacy blueprint.

Content

  • School and Community provide educators with professional development about effective practices to promote the following:
    • Oral language and vocabulary.
    • Phonological awareness.
    • Fluency.
    • Phonics.
    • Vocabulary.
    • Comprehension.
    • Writing.
  • Schools ensure that educators receive professional development in the use of appropriate assessment tools and the analysis of assessment results.

Delivery

  • The state, districts, and community agencies pool resources and expertise to increase training opportunities.
  • Teachers, including paraprofessionals, participate in staff development that is ongoing, collaborative, job-embedded, and includes mentoring/coaching
  • Frequency, intensity and duration of staff development varies with the needs of students as shown in data and with staff expertise as determined by needs assessment.
  • The state and districts work with local community organizations to use a range of technologies and media to provide information about literacy to parents including the following:
    • Web sites.
    • Video conferencing.
    • Social networking.
    • Parent institutes.
    • Print Media.
    • Television and radio.
  • University literacy instructors collaborate with school sites to prepare effective literacy teachers.

Resources

  • Schools provide written guides that break down essential elements and expectations of literacy to parents and community members. These guides are written in accessible language and available in families’ primary languages.
  • Schools engage community leaders including Elders and other cultural experts as key resources to support guidance, dissemination and implementation of the essential elements of the literacy blueprint.

Content

  • School and Community provide educators with professional development about effective practices to promote the following:
    • Disciplinary Literacy.
    • Vocabulary.
    • Comprehension.
    • Writing.
  • Schools ensure that educators receive professional development in the use of appropriate assessment tools and the analysis of assessment results.